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Summit Huts Association to reopen cabins July 1

Summit Huts Association to reopen cabins July 1

The Summit Huts Association has announced that Francie’s and Janet’s cabins will open for summer use July 1.

As part of novel coronavirus regulations, all future reservations at Summit Huts through Sept. 30 will be single-party only, which guarantees the group will have the entire cabin.

As such, Francie’s and Janet’s cabins will require a whole-hut reservation at a maximum capacity of 14 people. Pillows and sheets will no longer be provided at the huts, so Summit Huts recommends visitors bring their own pillow and XL-twin bed sheets to cover existing mattress covers.

Summit Huts also said it will require increased guest responsibilities for cleaning and sanitizing cabins at both entry and exit. The association added to expect higher-frequency staff visits during midday turnover as part of checking guest adherence to cleaning guidelines.

All saunas at Summit Huts cabins are temporarily closed.

Bookings from March 16 through May 31 that were canceled will receive a full credit with an expiration date of Sept. 30, 2021. Guests are encouraged to contact huts@huts.org or 970-925-5775 for rebooking information.

Visit SummitHuts.org/covid-19bookingsummer2020 for more information and for an updated hut cleaning checklist.

Beyond Summit County, the 10th Mountain Division Hut Association has opened some huts elsewhere in Colorado. For more information, visit Huts.org.

 

Summit Huts Association to reopen cabins July 1

Opening bars | Expanding capacity

Opening bars | Expanding capacity

KEYSTONE — The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has amended its safer-at-home order for the seventh time, opening nearly all businesses including bars.

Summit County’s current public health order defers to the state’s guidance on all regulations. The county plans to fall in line with the state guidelines, Summit County Commissioner Karn Stiegelmeier said.

“We have seen good progress, our numbers are at the level where we want to them to be,” she said. “Of course we’d like to see no cases, but we’ve had very few additional cases.”

Businesses that are able to reopen in Summit County will be required to fill out a physical distancing protocol form. The county is also keeping its face-covering requirement for people who are in a building open to the public or outside where a 6-foot distance isn’t possible.

The state’s amended order, which went into effect Thursday and was released Friday, allows bars to open at 25% capacity or with up to 50 people at a time, whichever is fewer. Regulations for bars are very similar to the guidelines that have been used for restaurants since they opened May 27. There is a limit of eight people per group, and customers in different parties have to remain 6 feet apart.

The ability to open bars will be great for the county’s economy, Stiegelmeier said.

“Of course the concern there is, it’s all about socializing,” she said. “So hopefully we will have people socializing in safe ways.”

The state health department also released official guidance on indoor activitiesoutdoor activities and residential camps. The new guidance on indoor and outdoor activities allows for theaters and malls to open. It also gives the OK to trade shows, auctions, parades, festivals, receptions and fairs.

However, there are capacity limitations based on the size of each venue. Both outdoor and indoor venues can use the state’s social distancing space calculator to determine how many people are allowed at the venue. The maximum number of people for an outdoor venue is 175 while the maximum for an indoor venue is 100.

Under the new guidance for indoor venues, extra-large businesses and organizations (more than 7,200 square feet) that had already opened, like restaurants and houses of worship, are allowed to have up to 100 people at a time. Previously, all restaurants were allowed a maximum of 50 people or 50% capacity, whichever was fewer. Tables and groups at restaurants are still limited to eight people and groups must be 6 feet apart.

The order also requires employees at all venues to wear face coverings and be screened for symptoms at the start of their shifts.

Residential camps are allowed to open under the amended order, as well. Groups are limited to 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors.

The order continues to ban “establishments primarily based on smoking,” which includes cigar bars, hookah lounges and companies with cannabis social-use licenses. Casinos, amusement parks and arcades also remain closed, and bounce houses and ball pits are prohibited at any public or commercial venue.

The amended safer-at-home order is separate from the protect-our-neighbors phase of reopening, which Polis announced Monday along with the changes to the order. The new phase will open everything at 50% capacity or up to 500 people, whichever is fewer.

That phase is not yet finalized, and the state has released only a draft framework of what it will look like. The department expects the final framework to be released in late June or early July.

Once the state transitions to the protect-our-neighbors phase, it will be available only to counties that meet certain thresholds. The state health department will approve counties that can prove a commitment to contact tracing, isolation, quarantine, community testing and targeted public health orders.

The state has not yet established the specific criteria the counties will have to meet to move into the phase, so it’s difficult for Summit County officials to know when the county will be able to loosen its restrictions.

“Opening bars | Expanding capacity”

Reference: https://www.summitdaily.com/news/colorado-releases-amended-public-health-order-opening-bars-and-expanding-capacity-at-large-restaurants/

Timeshares report strong showing | Uptown240

Timeshares report strong showing

Breckenridge Grand Vacations has a different story as it operates in the timeshare industry. CEO Mike Dudick reported that occupancy is very strong with occupancy levels on track to be equal to 2019 levels.

“My owners have already bought their time. They’ve already paid for the lodging in one respect so they’re really calling in to make a reservation for what they’ve already paid for. With that said our owners also have the privilege to rent additional time from us and that’s through the roof.

As for people who don’t have fractional ownership at BGV, Dudick said the call volume for non-owners to rent properties is up 50% year over year.

He said he is very optimistic about the future of the vacation and hospitality industry in Breckenridge. Dudick noted that he has observed people being very eager to be on vacation. Breckenridge Grand Vacation is following county and state health requirements but has instilled some company policies that go beyond requirements, such as the use of ultraviolet light technology to disinfect rooms and common areas. Dudick said that guests have been compliant with the safety protocols and that since reopening only one person has complained about restrictions to a point that rose above talking with the front desk attendant out of around a thousand guests that have come to their properties.

“Everybody gets it, they accept some of the realities, they understand the mask protocols, they understand what we’re doing in reservations to use amenities, things like that, people understand…my experience so far is that they’re willing to live with safety protocols that we have in place in order to be on vacation,” Dudick said.

 

“Timeshares report strong showing”

 

Reference: https://www.summitdaily.com/news/lodging-business-is-making-an-overall-slow-recovery-in-summit-county/

Lodging business is making an overall slow recovery in Summit County

Recovery in Summit County

DILLON — Lodging is open in Summit County, but while some lodging businesses are bouncing back quickly, others are waiting on further loosening of restrictions to bring back core business.

Lodging opened across Summit County on June 1 after months of empty hotels, condos, and short-term rentals. Now nearing the end of the first month open after the shutdown, occupancy in Summit County is still low compared to typical June numbers, but it is no longer nonexistent.

“April and May were basically unoccupied due to the Summit County Public Health Order — essential workers made up what little occupancy there was in town. As of May 31, Inntopia’s Destimetrics reported that Breckenridge’s June occupancy is down 77% (year over year),”  Breckenridge Tourism Office Public Relations Director Austyn Dineen said in an email.

Breckenridge Lodging Association President Toby Babich said that while things aren’t “back to normal,” people are excited to be open in any capacity.

“People are excited to open. It’s just nice to be able to function again and actually feel like we’re back in business but in terms of the business levels, we’re not seeing any dramatic spikes in demand,” Babich said.

Babich reported DestiMetrics industry numbers for Breckenridge, which show, in addition to June occupancy being down nearly 80%, July is anticipated to be about 50% down with August down about 30%. The overall aggregate summer total is down about 50% in occupancy. Babich said that while “it’s nice to be open,” the lodging industry is still really struggling.

As for operations, Babich said he felt the governor’s order gave good guidance, but that it is open to interpretation in some areas. For example, the order says that lodging facilities should wait 24 hours after guests have left a room before cleaning, but there is no mandate. He said guests have been appreciative of the efforts being made to look out for their safety, but that more often guests aren’t as concerned with the cleaning process and are mainly asking questions about cancellation policies and if certain amenities are open.

Babich, who is also president of Breckenridge Resort Managers, said his company is performing slightly better than the DestiMetrics report as he said the company is so far down 35% year over year as an aggregate summer from June to September.

He said that while the numbers aren’t great, they will allow the company to persevere through the summer to get to winter. Babich noted that the majority of his guests are in-state visitors with over half coming from the front rang or those who can drive to the area, such as visitors from Texas and Kansas.

He said that Summit County has been a desirable place to visit as there are a lot of activities people can do while physical distancing — hiking, lake activities such as kayaking and paddleboarding, biking, etc. and that people have been especially grateful to vacation this summer.

 

“Recovery in Summit County”

Referenced from: https://www.summitdaily.com/news/lodging-business-is-making-an-overall-slow-recovery-in-summit-county/

The Blue River is open for business.

SILVERTHORNE — The Blue River is open for business.

The Summit County Sheriff’s Office announced Tuesday afternoon that the Blue River had returned to safe conditions would be reopening for recreational activities immediately.

On June 1, the Sheriff’s Office and the town of Silverthorne were notified by Denver Water that flow levels were rapidly increasing to 1,000 cubic feet per second, presenting safety concerns for river recreationists.

Sheriff Jaime FitzSimons and Silverthorne Police Chief John Minor decided to temporarily close the river from the base of the Dillon Dam to the Sixth Street Bridge, where the water was high enough to injure someone floating past that point.

On Tuesday afternoon, the Sheriff’s Office and town got the thumbs up from Denver Water that flow levels on the river had significantly decreased and were once again safe for recreation. At 1 p.m. Tuesday, the Blue River below Dillon Dam was flowing at 301 cfs.

While the river has opened back up, officials are reminding anyone heading out on the water to use caution. Members of the public are encouraged to review the Summit County Swift Water Safety and Flood Preparedness Guide available on the county’s website. The guide contains information on the history of high water events in the county, along with instructions for building sandbag levees, household checklists, flood insurance information, safety tips for recreating and more.

“In light of the reopening of the river, I want to remind the recreating public to always remain vigilant of changing river conditions and always wear a personal floatation device when recreating in or around any river or body of water,” FitzSimons said.

The Dillon Nature Preserve | What to do around Dillon, CO?

The Dillon Nature Preserve | Uptown240 | What to do in Dillon, CO?

The Dillon Nature Preserve is open summer and winter for pedestrians, snowshoes and cross-country skiing. It features a large relatively-flat gravel road and two hiking trails: Meadow Trail and Ridge Trail Loop. Small footpaths descend to the Lake for fisherman and lakeshore exploration. Find beautiful mountain vistas, lake views, and wildflowers. Dogs are allowed, but bicycles are not. A very family-friendly hiking experience. The gravel road is plowed in winter.

Directions To the Nature Preserve Entrance:

From the parking area, head west to meet up with the paved recreational path. Follow the path West to the Nature Preserve Signboard and Map. A gate and bicycle rack are located at the entrance.

Nature Preserve facilities include:

  • Access to the lakeshore
  • Incredible mountain and lake views
  • Photo opportunity sites
  • Trails with benches, overlooks and interpretive signs?
  • Easy gravel road popular with families and runners
  • Footpaths to the lakeshore
  • Fishing
  • Wildflowers
  • Woods
  • Bluebird Boxes
  • Bike Rack at entrance
  • Mutt Mitt boxes
  • Trails open winter and summer
  • Plowed gravel road

Meadow Trail And Ridge Trail Loop

Both trails are peaceful forested escapes and are ideal for hiking, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. Both trails offer overlooks and benches perfect for a rest and a chance to absorb the views.

Along the trails you will encounter educational signs about the history of the area, the trees, the wildlife and the native plants found throughout the Nature Preserve. The interpretive signs were designed and written by Dillon Valley Elementary School 5th Graders.

Meadow Trail

From the Nature Preserve Gate, take the dirt road for .5 miles with Lake Dillon and the Gore Range visible to the right; you will be directly across the Lake from the Dillon Marina. At this point, turn left onto a trail that winds up a hill through a meadow. Ascend to the overlook and return the same way.

Ridge Trail Loop

Begin following the Meadow Trail. At the top of the hill you can take a right onto the Ridge Trail Loop. Continue straight west as the trail rises and falls.

At the first trail fork, ascend a short distance to the overlook on your left. Peaks 1 and 2 can be seen to the south over the Snake River Arm of Lake Dillon. Mount Guyot is to the southeast.

Return from the overlook to the Ridge Loop Trail. Continue west and look for two more overlooks on the left side of the trail. Hike out of the wooded area and meet the gravel road that leads back to the Summit County Recreation Path and your car.

The trails at the Dillon Nature Preserve are considered easy hiking trails, however they do ascend and descend and have root and rock obstacles. For smooth walking, enjoy the gravel road.

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.6147107,-106.0306086,16z

 

 

“The Dillon Nature Preserve | Uptown240 | What to do in Dillon, CO?”

 

Fish Lake Dillon CO | Uptown240 | Dillon, CO

Fish Lake Dillon CO | Uptown240 | Dillon, CO

Dillon Reservoir is a prime location for summer or winter fishing. The lake is home to Brown Trout, Rainbow Trout, Kokanee Salmon, and Arctic Char. With 26 miles of shoreline, finding a nice secluded spot to cast is not a problem. Click here for current fishing conditions.

A brief history of fishing conditions on Dillon Reservoir
The Mysis shrimp was introduced into Dillon Reservoir in 1970 as a food source to fatten trout and salmon. But the small nocturnal crustaceans missed the trout’s daytime feeding patterns and began eating all of the zooplankton — leaving salmon and trout hungry and small.

The Arctic char was introduced to the reservoir in 1990 to see if they would feed on the shrimp — the main part of their diet. Colorado Parks and Wildlife manages the fishery; Arctic char was stocked in Dillon in 1990, 1992, 1996, 1998, and 2008 to 2011. The reservoir is the only public fishery in the lower 48 states outside of Maine where anglers have a chance of landing the prized fish.

The fishing ecosystem at Dillon Reservoir has been steadily improving since the early 90’s thanks in part to the introduction of Arctic Char by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. Typically found only in Arctic waters, this cold-water fish — a species of trout — has helped turn the reservoir into an angler’s paradise.

Taken from: https://www.townofdillon.com/marina/fishing-report

“Fish Lake Dillon CO | Uptown240 | Dillon, CO”

Lake Dillon Adventure Public | Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center | Uptown240

Lake Dillon Adventure Public | Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center | Uptown240

On Thursday, June 18th, each BOEC Lake Dillon Adventure will start with a quick orientation before heading out on the water for a relaxing, beautiful, and fun paddle. All participants will have their own kayak equipped with outriggers to minimize the risk of flipping. Multi-seat kayaks will be available for friends that want to paddle together and, in addition to the boats, BOEC will provide PFD’s, instruction and supervision, extra hand sanitizer, a mobile hand washing station, and additional masks to all participants.

9:00am to 11:30am for 14-16-year-olds (Limit 7)
1:00pm to 3:30pm for 17-20-year-olds (Limit 7)

Advance registration and a waiver signed by an adult/legal guardian is required for all activities. Interested individuals must register through Building Hope by visiting https://buildinghopesummit.org/events.

 

“Lake Dillon Adventure Public | Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center | Uptown240”

Summer is here! | Uptown240 | Lake Dillon | Dillon, CO

Summer is here! | Uptown240 | Lake Dillon | Dillon, CO

It’s a beautiful June day here at Uptown240 and the Dillon Farmer’s Market has its first day today!!

“Summer is here! | Uptown240 | Lake Dillon | Dillon, CO”

Frisco Pedestrian Promenade Shop | Local Program Launch June 12

Frisco Pedestrian Promenade & Shop | Local Program Launch June 12

On Friday, June 12, the Town of Frisco will launch a shop local program called “Love Frisco, Shop Frisco” and the Frisco Pedestrian Promenade, which answers the call of businesses who are in need of more square footage to bring their occupancy to normal levels. The shop local program will encourage over $270,000 of spending in local businesses, and the Promenade will transform three blocks of Frisco Main Street, from 2nd Avenue to 5th Avenue, into a pedestrian and bike-only zone with open-air dining and shopping.

Taken from: https://www.friscogov.com/homepage-news/frisco-pedestrian-promenade-shop-local-program-starts-june-12/

“Frisco Pedestrian Promenade & Shop | Local Program Launch June 12”